Cincinnati Reds Top Prospects: How much power do they hit for?

Today I wanted to look at the power numbers for all of the hitters in my Top 40 list who had at least 200 plate appearances in the 2012 season. In the chart below I have listed the Isolated Power to each field, sorted from highest total to lowest total. On the right side of the chart is the home field park factors for where each guy played (adjusted for playing time at each level for guys who played at multiple levels). Basically, anything above .000 is favorable for the hitters (hitters park), while anything below it is unfavorable (pitchers park). The numbers are only adjusted against other parks in their specific league, not against all of the minor leagues.

While I only am showing the home park factors, I thought I would add in at least which leagues are considered to be hitter/pitcher friendly. Keep that in mind when evaluating the above data below.

Pitcher friendly leagues: Midwest (Dayton) and International (Louisville).

Hitter friendly leagues: Arizona, Pioneer (Billings), California (Bakersfield) and Southern (Pensacola).

Isolated Power Home Park IsoP Park Factor
Player Pull Side CF Opposite Total Pull Side CF Opposite
Donald Lutz .791 .560 .384 1.735 .060 .078 .090
Seth Mejias-Brean .926 .353 .409 1.688 -.118 -.018 .144
David Vidal .800 .432 .120 1.352 .140 .055 .082
Travis Mattair .755 .292 .270 1.317 .036 .128 .022
Steve Selsky .612 .274 .372 1.258 .037 .101 .019
Neftali Soto .695 .198 .362 1.255 -.008 -.013 -.045
Yorman Rodriguez .507 .347 .333 1.187 .038 .080 .018
Jesse Winker .242 .270 .607 1.119 .144 -.018 -.118
Tanner Rahier .588 .190 .333 1.111 -.136 .081 .140
Devin Lohman .699 .101 .220 1.020 .036 .128 .022
Average .662 .302 .341 1.304 N/A N/A N/A
Ryan Wright .547 .243 .191 .981 .039 .090 .020
Kyle Waldrop .583 .241 .145 .969 .017 .075 .039
Tucker Barnhart (LHH) .460 .246 .261 .967 .060 .095 .150
Billy Hamilton (RHH) .375 .250 .294 .919 .066 .100 .042
Henry Rodriguez (RHH) .633 .125 .154 .912 .095 .020 .065
Bryson Smith .382 .203 .286 .871 .105 .075 .060
Billy Hamilton (LHH) .360 .176 .262 .798 .042 .100 .066
Ryan LaMarre .393 .104 .215 .712 .172 .032 .102
Jonathan Reynoso .433 .000 .250 .683 -.136 .081 .140
Josh Fellhauer .271 .164 .235 .670 .102 .032 .172
Tucker Barnhart (RHH) .250 .000 .067 .317 .150 .095 .060
Henry Rodriguez (LHH) .076 .058 .115 .249 .065 .020 .095

Donald Lutz tops the list, which is no surprise if you have ever seen him run into a baseball before. He also led the way with power to center, which isn’t a surprise for both the previously mentioned reason and the fact that Bakersfield, where he spent a lot of his time, has a 350 foot fence in center. Newcomer Seth Mejias-Brean finds himself second on the list. What is interesting is how much power he hit for to the pull side despite left field in Billings playing quite favorably for pitchers. His pull side power led everyone on the list. Supplemental first rounder Jesse Winker led the way in opposite field power, which is quite impressive due to the previously mentioned way that left field plays in Billings.

At the bottom of the list are Tucker Barnhart from the right side and Henry Rodriguez from the left side. They are separated from the group by a significant margin. Rodriguez was recovering from an injury and hasn’t been as poor historically as he was in 2012. With that said, he has only had pull power in the past from either side of the plate. Tucker Barnhart has not had an extra-base hit to center field in the last two seasons as a right hander and only a few to the opposite field in the last two seasons combined from the right side. From the left side he is quite a bit better.

About Doug Gray

Doug Gray is the owner and operator of this website and has been running it since 2004 in one variation or another. You can follow him on twitter @dougdirt24, contact him via email here or follow the site on Facebook. and Youtube.