After going 2-4 in the Dominican Winter League playoff opener on Tuesday night, Jose Siri and his Gigantes teammates saw a frightening thing happen on Wednesday night. Scheduled to play at 7pm, about 30 minutes before the game began a fire broke out and it was not a small one.

It was a scary scene and eventually the fire department was able to put the blaze out. There were some issues, though, in getting to the fire. Regardless, things eventually got under control but it was a scary situation for the fans, employees and players at the stadium.

On Thursday night the Gigantes took the field once again, this time at home. They would lose 8-3, but it wasn’t due to the efforts of Cincinnati Reds prospect Jose Siri. After hitting .321 during the regular season in the Dominican Winter League, he’s kept that going in the playoffs.

Jose Siri was the only Cibao player to have more than one hit in the game. In the 5th inning he smashed a line drive double into left field. He was stranded on second base, though. The next time he came to the plate he would take an 0-2 pitch and homer to the opposite field.

Sebastian Elizalde closing in on Mexican League batting title

The Mexican Winter League regular season comes to an end tonight. Sebastian Elizalde  has hit .452 over his last 10 games, and has gone 3-6 over the last two nights. Every last one of those hits were needed, too. He’s hitting .380/.446/.524 on the season in 250 at-bats for Culiacan. His .380 average leads the league, and he’s been on top of the leaderboard for quite a while. But Manny Rodriguez has been closing in and fast. He’s hit .511 over the last 10 games, including going 11-18 in his last four games. It’s pushed his average up to .371. With another big night for Rodriguez, and a possible 0-for from Elizalde, it’s possible he could lose his 9-point lead on the last day of the season.

Cincinnati - T Shirt

35 Responses

  1. MK

    If he could have an impressive Spring Training Jose might just by-pass Daytona for Pensacola. Defensively he is on Hamilton’s level now.

    • Doug Gray

      I’d be shocked if they skipped him a level. I don’t remember the last time they did that with a guy who wasn’t skipping Dayton.

      • MK

        Checking the Gigantes roster, every position player with the exception of Jose has played AA or higher, so he has proven he can excel with players at that level of competition.

        And, if they do not get Billy traded before spring he might go at deadline and a AA Siri could be a replacement option for the remainder of ’18 or beginning of ’19.

      • Doug Gray

        He’s proven he can hang for about 75 at-bats.

        The chances he skips Advanced-A are about the same as the Reds hiring me as a scout this year. Slim and none.

  2. RobL

    While I am not sold on Siri’s ability to make enough contact at higher levels, I feel like he is almost untouchable right now. As MK pointed out, his defense in center is already very good. He has tapped into his power in games now. As long as his walk rate stays at 6 and his K rate stays under 25, he is at least an average player and probably better.

    At the same time, it would seem unlikely that he would headline a significant trade. He would be the second or third piece. And I couldn’t bear to lose him and a higher rate prospect in just about any trade. I mean, it’s not like we are wanting to see something he hasn’t done before. Even with a babip regression, we just need him to do what he did last season. And if he were to take a step forward in his K rate, he would be great.

    So, I think you have to keep him in the system to see exactly what you have. If he continues what he did, then you have Hamilton’s successor. If he regresses, then he still fills the lottery ticket slot in a future trade.

    • Doug Gray

      I’m not for giving him away, but if he’s the second piece in a trade for Archer or Yelich, I’m willing to move almost anyone.

    • Reaganspad

      I am pretty sure he is headed back to OSU for his Senior season

  3. 44Reds

    Doug, since we are talking about a Yelich trade again: You have said that Greene should be essentially untouchable. With the track record of high-ceiling HS pitchers like him, however, wouldn’t trading him for Yelich be the prudent move? As a 19 year old pitching prospect, Isn’t Greene more likely to be below average than a star? Could Green and a 10-15 prospect get you Yelich?

    • Shamrock

      Especially if we could get Heliot Ramos from SF in a swap for Billy.

      It’d be essentially:
      Greene
      Hamilton
      for
      Ramos
      Yelich

      I’d certainly consider that to be a very productive exchange…

      • Shamrock

        Heck, this time next year there’s a good possibility a lot of scouts will agree that we not only grabbed the better pro CF (pretty obvious), but also wound up with the better 2017 draft prospect of the two.
        I, for one, would be thrilled to see both deals go through…

      • CP

        Getting Ramos for Hamilton makes me feel much better about trading away Trammel, but not as much Greene. I would much rather include Trammel with 2-3 other guys that are quality rather than give up Greene.

        I get the point that Greene has a higher level of risk, but he also has potentially the highest ceiling of anyone in our system. Plus his eta being 3-4 years is actually a really good thing, because he can serve to help extend their window of being competitive by being the fixture of the next rotation. In 3-4 years Disco, Finny and Bailey will all be gone. So having Greene coming along at that point will be big!

    • Stock

      With one exception, I feel like a small market team like the Reds should never trade prospects for an established player unless it is an outright steal. Neither Archer nor Yelich will come cheap. The exception being if come July they feel a specific player is needed to put them over the hump to win the World Series.

      Where is the value in trading for Yelich? The pitching was the worst in the majors last year and it doesn’t really matter how good the offense is, with our current pitching we still can’t compete with the best in the NL.

      • Doug Gray

        The Houston Astros pitching was fairly mediocre until they added Justin Verlander on the final second of August. When they had a lead in their division of 20 games. Their offense was just on an entirely different level than the rest of the league. You don’t need an elite pitching staff to compete and win. You need a solid one if your offense is outstanding. Adding Yelich, Winker and Senzel to Suarez and Votto, while subtracting Hamilton and one of the corner guys probably doesn’t get their offense to the Astros level, but it probably makes them a well above-average offense. Put that with a solid pitching staff (let’s call it league average) and that’s a team that could compete. And once you get into the playoffs, anything can happen.

    • Doug Gray

      Teams like the Reds, more than most, need to be able to develop stars. When you’ve got guys with superstar potential, you probably shouldn’t trade them.

      • Datdudejs

        If he has superstar trade value right now, I would trade him without a second thought. We have had probably 10 pitchers in the last 5 years that were just like him, and only one looks like he’s even gonna stay a starter for sure at the major league level.

      • Doug Gray

        The Reds have had maybe one guy in the last 50 years that was remotely in the conversation to being “like” Hunter Greene. And that was Homer Bailey after he was dominating in Double-A.

        I understand, 100%, why people would be in favor of trading him in a deal that brings back a proven, cheap and under control All-Star caliber player. But, I wouldn’t do it in almost all cases. And I don’t think the Reds are going to be considering it, either.

      • Datdudejs

        Really? Because I’ll bet you 100 dollars castillo has a better career, and I bet it’s not even close.

      • Doug Gray

        I’d never take that bet. But it doesn’t change anything about about being the type of prospect or future pitcher that Hunter Greene *could* be. A year ago there were professional scouts that weren’t convinced that Luis Castillo was even a starting pitcher. They were very incorrect, but from a prospect standpoint, he’s never been remotely close to the kind of guy that Hunter Greene is today.

      • Datdudejs

        Plus Chapman, Iglesias, Stephenson, Bailey, Stewart, Lorenzen, Volquez, ect. All had big time fastballs with potentially plus secondary offering but all had command and durability issues just like him.

        I specifically remember you saying Stewart would win the cy young after we traded him to Toronto.

      • Doug Gray

        Hunter Greene is a better prospect than every last one of those guys, sans Bailey, and that was only after Bailey dominated Double-A. I’d love to know where you’ve got the idea that Greene has command and durability issues from, because there’s zero evidence of those existing.

        The Stewart stuff was me speaking emotionally, and angry about the deal. At the time Toronto was turning pitchers into guys that were exceeding their expectations. Combine that with the emotional part, and viola – bad, hot take. I do my best to avoid doing that these days. Sidenote, he was never remotely close to the same guy once he left the organization. He almost immediately lost 2-3 MPH on his fastball.

      • Datdudejs

        So you agree that he is over valued based on “prospect status” and therefore we should trade him now while he has enough value to bring back a very good to great player…

      • Stock

        You are way wrong here Doug.

        Dallas Keuchel 1st half ERA was 1.75
        Peacock 2.65
        McCullers 3.06
        Morton 3.85
        Fiers 3.86

        Pretty good 1st half ERA’s

        Bullpen:

        Devenski 2.75
        Giles 3.36
        Harris 2.90
        Feliz 3.90

        They built their lead with good pitching combined with great hitting. Neither of which the Reds have so to trade the future for the present doesn’t make sense. So the Reds finish in 3rd next year instead of 4th. Who cares.

      • Doug Gray

        The Houston Astros ERA+ was 96. League average is 100. As an entire pitching staff, they were below-average at run prevention for the year. They won 101 games.

      • Datdudejs

        He has pitched 4 innings in two years. That’s a durability issue. He has given up 8 hits, 7 runs and a walk in 4 innings. That shows he has poor command so far.

      • Doug Gray

        And I’ll also add that he’s thrown far more than 4 innings in two years. He pitched his junior year in high school. He pitched for a short period of time as a senior, too. Then he had a break in action. He threw 4 innings as a pro before the season ended. Then he threw in instructional league – games with multiple innings.

        If you wanted to say he needs to show he can throw 125 innings, 150 innings, 175 innings in a season – go for it. I’ll agree with you all day long. That applies to every 17-year-old in professional baseball, though – it’s not unique to Hunter Greene. I do take issue suggesting he’s got a durability problem, though. That suggests he’s a 1-2 inning guy before his stuff falls off the map. Or that he’s a guy who see’s his stuff fall off the map after, say 50 innings in a season. We know that the first part of that isn’t true. We have no idea if the second part of that is or not.

      • Bill

        Datdudejs, Several first round draft picks didn’t pitch even one inning. Greene did pitch this summer and in the instructional program this fall. He pitched for scouts and front office personnel multiple times, too. I haven’t read a single scouting report that cited durability or control issues. If you have seen credible sources, please share with the rest of us. It is illogical to draw any conclusions from Greene’s 4 innings in his pro debut. That said, he has a long way to go and there’s significant risk with any young pitcher.

        With regards to Yelich, I don’t think the Reds should trade either Greene or Senzel and I’m thinking a package led by Trammell would need several more prospects to get Miami interested unless the Reds take on bad contracts, too.

      • Stock

        I have no clue where you are getting information that states the Astros pitching was below average. I got my information from fangraphs. According to Fangraphs the Astros had the 5th best pitching in the 1st half and 6th best for the entirety of the season. Just as important they had the best offense on the season. 10% better than the 2nd place Dodgers and 20% better than the third place Yankees. Nice gap. Plus they played in a division where no one else won half their games. Please note on this chart I am attaching that the Reds pitching is 30th out of 30 teams at 0.5. The Twins at 29 are 2.4. Pretty big spread there.

        Rank Team Wins Loses Saves Games GS IP K/9 BB/9 HR/9 BABIP LOB% GB% HR/FB ERA FIP Xfip WAR

        1 Dodgers 61 29 26 365 90 806.1 9.69 2.69 1.03 0.278 78.60% 42.10% 11.80% 3.15 3.47 3.71 15.8

        2 Diamondbacks 53 36 23 350 89 797 9.38 3.22 1.01 0.29 75.20% 48.20% 12.50% 3.43 3.67 3.81 14.2

        3 Indians 47 40 20 351 87 768.2 10.03 2.85 1.12 0.305 74.30% 44.10% 14.10% 3.78 3.6 3.55 14.2

        4 Red Sox 50 39 25 347 89 794.2 9.4 2.6 1.21 0.307 75.20% 40.40% 12.60% 3.83 3.79 3.94 13.5

        5 Astros 60 29 24 367 89 800 10.15 3.17 1.17 0.295 74.80% 47.60% 15.10% 3.93 3.77 3.61 13.1

        6 Yankees 45 41 17 338 86 768 9.4 3.06 1.24 0.29 72.70% 46.60% 14.40% 4.04 4 3.91 11.7

        7 Rockies 52 39 30 383 91 812.1 7.93 3.47 1.19 0.296 72.60% 48.10% 14.40% 4.45 4.38 4.3 9.9

        8 Cardinals 43 45 26 374 88 798 8.44 3.1 1.14 0.296 73.30% 46.30% 13.40% 3.98 4.1 4.13 9.4

        9 Nationals 52 36 20 342 88 789.1 9.02 3.03 1.29 0.295 73.10% 43.30% 13.80% 4.17 4.15 4.14 9.3

        10 Blue Jays 41 47 25 392 88 789 8.82 3.41 1.29 0.306 71.40% 45.60% 13.80% 4.53 4.3 4.28 9

        11 Brewers 50 41 28 390 91 818.2 8.18 3.46 1.21 0.298 74.60% 45.70% 13.70% 4.08 4.38 4.38 8.9

        12 Rays 47 43 30 348 90 805 8.07 3.3 1.14 0.29 71.70% 42.00% 11.90% 4.17 4.23 4.47 8.4

        13 Cubs 43 45 20 370 88 785 8.75 3.54 1.2 0.287 72.30% 47.10% 14.60% 4.1 4.26 4.14 8.3

        14 Pirates 42 47 18 358 89 800.2 7.4 2.83 1.14 0.303 73.00% 45.60% 12.80% 4.2 4.22 4.32 8.1

        15 Royals 44 43 20 355 87 775.1 7.86 3.34 1.14 0.299 73.50% 43.20% 11.20% 4.24 4.27 4.64 7.7

        16 Athletics 39 50 19 359 89 784 7.89 3.13 1.24 0.295 66.10% 45.80% 13.70% 4.78 4.39 4.39 7.2

        17 Giants 34 56 19 369 90 813.1 7.58 3.02 1.12 0.317 70.00% 42.90% 11.50% 4.68 4.19 4.5 6.9

        18 Tigers 39 48 19 339 87 762.2 7.67 3.53 1.29 0.308 70.50% 39.70% 12.20% 4.87 4.6 4.83 6.9

        19 Angels 45 47 20 376 92 817 8.34 3.04 1.43 0.286 75.60% 41.40% 14.30% 4.2 4.49 4.4 6.4

        20 Phillies 29 58 11 351 87 775 7.62 3.26 1.42 0.299 73.00% 41.40% 13.70% 4.65 4.72 4.72 5.9

        21 Rangers 43 45 13 342 88 783.2 7.17 3.45 1.33 0.288 73.20% 44.90% 13.90% 4.38 4.76 4.73 5.6

        22 White Sox 38 49 13 359 87 760.1 8.07 3.81 1.41 0.287 71.40% 41.90% 14.00% 4.52 4.78 4.74 5.4

        23 Mets 39 47 19 386 86 773 8.76 3.69 1.42 0.317 71.50% 45.70% 15.80% 4.94 4.61 4.34 5.3

        24 Padres 38 50 24 369 88 776.1 8.54 3.34 1.39 0.302 70.90% 50.20% 17.00% 4.68 4.56 4.16 5.1

        25 Marlins 41 46 17 398 87 771.2 8.02 3.9 1.1 0.29 69.50% 41.50% 11.00% 4.62 4.41 4.79 5.1

        26 Braves 42 45 21 369 87 783 7.36 3.47 1.28 0.292 69.60% 44.90% 13.10% 4.68 4.65 4.72 4.5

        27 Orioles 42 46 22 348 88 782.2 7.54 3.75 1.48 0.314 72.20% 43.60% 14.70% 5.07 5 4.85 4.3

        28 Mariners 43 47 16 365 90 800 7.39 3.24 1.54 0.277 72.80% 41.80% 14.80% 4.56 4.92 4.75 3.4

        29 Twins 45 43 25 360 88 785.2 6.94 3.33 1.55 0.294 71.80% 43.20% 14.70% 4.9 5.1 4.94 2.4

        30 Reds 39 49 19 358 88 781.2 8.01 3.81 1.68 0.29 72.80% 45.20% 18.40% 5.05 5.24 4.62 0.5

      • Doug Gray

        ERA+, which is ERA adjusted for ballparks played in. It’s available at Baseball-Reference. League average is 100. Anything above 100 is considered above-average, and anything below is considered below-average. The Astros of 2017 were at 96. Below-average. Not by much. But still, below-average.

        And I’ll be sure to note, for the millionth time, that pitching WAR is trash. It’s a garbage stat. Fangraphs pitching WAR is based around FIP, which is fine for telling us how someone would likely perform in the future with the same peripherals, but it’s not exactly good at telling us how someone performed during the given time frame. Likewise, Baseball-Reference pitching WAR is based around actual runs. I think it’s a little bit better than Fangraphs pitching WAR because it’s at least trying to use actual runs allowed, but it still leaves plenty to be desired.

  4. Paul Nyhart

    I know you previously mentioned you hadn’t put a ton of time in studying Ramos as he wasn’t a part of the Reds system (at least not yet) but I wonder if Siri has as much buzz around him right now as Ramos i.e. are looked at as equal prospects.

    Obviously there’s the proverbial caveat with Siri’s age, but that also puts him closer to the majors I would think — especially given his recent showing in the DWL.

    • Doug Gray

      I’d venture to guess that Ramos is universally regarded as a significantly better prospect than Siri is. Ramos is likely a Top 100 prospect right now. Siri isn’t.

  5. Clammy

    the Reds seem to be comfortable with 3 way trades; perhaps trading Hamilton to SF. The Giants agree to take Brad Ziegler and his 9 million dollars owed from the Marlins, which would mitigate the package we would give them for Yelich. We get one of the OF prospects from the Giants not named Ramos. We explore trades for Duvall and / or Scooter to fill a young SS / Young Utility type.