This episode of The Unnamed Reds Podcast is the longest that we’ve ever had, but it’s packed full of goodness. In this episode we were joined by C. Trent Rosecrans to talk a little bit of Reds, a little bit of the farm system, and his new gig with The Athletic as they open up a “Cincinnati” wing at the site. Here’s how the entire episode breaks down:

  • The catching position for 2018 and how it will play out with Tucker Barnhart and Devin Mesoraco.
  • Is there collusion in Major League Baseball this offseason?
  • Talking with C. Trent Rosecrans about The Athletic, the Reds, and the Reds farm system (32:40 for those who want to skip ahead).

If you would like to download this episode directly, you can do that here.

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16 Responses

  1. MK

    Rafael De Paula’s Dominicab Republic team will play Puerto Rico for Carribbean World Series Championship tonight.

    Reply
  2. The Duke

    I know catchers are usually paired with pitchers on their own team for familiarity and consistency, but I’m intrigued about the idea of starting Mesoraco against LHP regardless of who is pitching. Since the majority of SP are RHP, Barnhart likely still gets hit 100-120 starts, but it would optimize his strength offensively and Mesoraco’s offensive strength as well. I think that kind of tandem could lead to .800+ OPS production out of the catcher spot. Perhaps a good deal over.

    Reply
  3. sixpacktwo

    Doug, you answered your own question! There is no incentive to buy into high priced free agents unless you are ready to compete. Winning 5-10 more games and spending 10-20 million more does not make sense. Also, the top teams only need two/three players not 10 so with 100 available 60-70 will not find the price range THEY want. YOUR WRONG ON THIS ONE.

    Reply
    • Josh

      I agree with sixpacktwo. There is zero collusion. Its called there are a bunch of non impact players that teams that are not in win now mode don’t want to pay for.

      Doug asks why don’t the Reds sign a back up middle infielder to a non minor league deal. That makes completely zero sense. Dilson is out of options, everyone wants Senzel up now, add in Scooter, Blandino and then you have Peraza at short. Why in the world would the Reds waste money on a back up SS. I mean they aren’t going anywhere anyway. If Peraza doesn’t get it done this year or gets hurt too bad play the rest of those fools at short and just have a really bad SS. If your not gonna make the playoffs spending money on back ups that will just take AB’s away from (Blandino, Scooter and Herrara) makes no sense. Sorry Doug bad argument.

      Reply
      • Doug Gray

        The Reds literally have one shortstop on the 40-man roster: Jose Peraza. The next closest to the big leagues shortstop, defensively, is either Calten Daal, who hasn’t played in a year and a half and isn’t expected to be ready to start the season, or Blake Trahan, who had an OPS under .600 last year in Double-A. Maybe the Reds don’t need to sign a backup shortstop to a big league deal, but they need to sign SOMEONE that can actually play shortstop to put in Triple-A. The “just play a bad shortstop there” thing doesn’t work when you’ve got all young or coming back from injury pitchers. It’s just a terrible plan.

        But, if all that you took from my discussion was “there is collusion because the Reds haven’t signed a backup infielder”, then either you missed the point or I made my points very terribly. The fact that 13 teams haven’t signed a single position player to an MLB deal this offseason is exhibit A. That literally every single one of the top 6 free agents is still without a job on February 9th is exhibit B. I think that the fact that JD Martinez, who slugged .690 last year only has a single 5-year offer on the table is exhibit C. I think that we’ve had multitudes of evidence, even going back to November, that GM’s blatently have stated they all seem to have the plan to “wait free agents out” is exhibit D. I could keep on going. This isn’t just one thing. There’s a lot of things. I’m not saying it’s for sure collusion….. but I’m saying there’s enough there that no one should be saying there’s no way it’s happening.

    • wes

      Seems like to me teams wised up and once again, dominated the players. Prior to this year- how many free agents contracts are team friendly vs player? I’d say less than 20% favor teams. Teams gotta be sick and tired of paying these bloated contracts with no significant return on their investment and imo- significant loss. Also while tying up a roster spot. You really think Homer is worth a 25 man roster spot?

      Throwing away 5-10 million on a player like alfrod is WAY easier to stomach than seeing Homer Bailey make 20 mil a season. What’s a better investment- paying a hundred million to Bailey over this current time span or paying 100 million to Luis Robert over the next six some years? What about Darvish for 125 mil? Who ya got???

      Padres spent 78 million signing international players and where still linked to Robert because they get it…the movement of the game is to youth not old veterans who’s best days are behind them. Owners realized that way before players did

      Reply
  4. sixpacktwo

    ‘Weird going on?’ Maybe they have seen the future of their ways. (going broke, raising ticket prices beyond customer ability to pay, etc) Paying players just to make them richer does not help the fan at all.

    Reply
    • sixpacktwo

      I should not have said ‘going broke’ as that will not happen. Losing money would be very possible, as spending more than income can always happen.

      Reply
    • Doug Gray

      What’s the fan got to do with this?

      And no one in MLB is going broke. The owners are raking in money hand over first.

      Reply
  5. Colorado Red

    Doug,
    While I personally doubt there is collusion I do there are several reasons for this.
    1. The NEW CBA, with the %penalty going up each year.
    2. The Not so great class. JD is very poor Defensively, a great 2 month, and solid last few years. YU his post season stuff, etc.
    3. Next years class, if it is slow, then you really have to question what is going on.
    4. Teams are trying a bit harder to be realistic.
    5. Scott Boras telling his players he is worth more.
    6. The top FA’s are holding out.

    Reply
  6. DX

    Why should an owner pay for what the player has done the last five years? If he is 32 then he should be paid for what the thinks he will be worth at ages 33+. Eric Milton ring a bell? Barry Larkin at age 37? Look at his stats and what the Reds paid for.

    Last time I checked, none of the players invested their life savings in a baseball team. The owners take the risk and deserve the profit. Does anyone really care if any of the free agents ever sign?

    Now I agree that the players are not being paid for their earlier years and agree that should change in the free market. Mike Trout has been underpaid. But if the young players have been underpaid by another team, I don’t want the Reds to overpay to balance it out.

    I heard a stat that if you take the 20 highest paid free agents over the last 40 years making it 800 players. The Reds are dead last in signing these guys over that span. I heard it was like 2. Even the Rays have signed 6. I can’t recall where I heard it for validity purposes.

    Reply
    • Doug Gray

      Why should the owners not have to pay for production at some point? They don’t pay young guys because prices are locked in for 3 years, then they get a fraction of their true value in arbitration the next 3.

      Then, as it’s always been, guys get paid for what they’ve done in the past.

      And not a single one of those owners invested their life savings in the team. The owners are getting massive amounts of revenue, simply by being rich enough to buy the team. This isn’t like being the CEO of Apple or Microsoft where your decisions can drastically alter the value of your company. The owners are getting more of the revenue today than they have in the last 30+ years. Please, for the love of God, don’t side with the billionaire owners who are getting more of the pie than ever and try to say you feel sorry for them. That’s outlandish.

      This isn’t about the Reds. This is about baseball. I’m far more concerned about baseball than I am the Reds.

      Reply
  7. The Duke

    It’s not collusion, it’s the owners just completely working the MLBPA in the last CBA negotiations because of the ineptitude of Tony Clark. If they want a fixed percentage of revenues, that usually comes tied to a salary cap in most sports, and a cap that goes up/down based on the increase/decline in revenues.

    Reply
  8. dwick

    As both a Reds and Giants fan, I assure you Buster Posey has NEVER caught 130+ games in a regular season. The most regular season games Buster has EVER caught was 123 in 2016 and Bochy has sworn he’ll never catch that many again (last season he caught 99 games) In his 6 full non-injury seasons Buster has averaged 112 games at catcher.

    Nick Hundley was Posey’s back-up last season catching 60 complete games. Previous to 2017, the Giants had various combos of Eli Whiteside, Hector Sanchez, Andrew Susac (now with the Brewers), and Trevor Brown catching 40 to 60 games per season.

    Reply
    • Doug Gray

      This is what I get for looking at games played and assuming, dwick. You know what assuming makes me, don’t you?

      Reply

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