When the 2019 season began, Jameson Hannah was not in the Cincinnati Reds organization. The 2018 2nd round pick was beginning his season in the California League, playing for the Stockton Ports in the Oakland Athletics organization.

The season didn’t get out to a great start for the outfielder. Jameson Hannah went 4-25 in the first week of the season with four walks. In the second week he went 10-22 (.455), turning things up a notch or five – but it was short lived. Over the final 11 games of April he went 7-46 (.152). In the 23 games during the month he hit just .226/.280/.323 in 100 plate appearances. He also went 1-4 in stolen base attempts.

Things went quite a bit better in May. In the first 13 games of the month he went  18-51 (.353) with three doubles and four walks. The second half of the month was more of the same as he hit .298 with five extra-base hits and three more walks. For the month he posted a .327/.382/.418 line in the hitter friendly league. He added one steal on the month and was caught another time.

The hitting in May carried on over into June. Through the 9th he went 11-34 with five walks and six strikeouts. There was a small hiccup for three games that followed as he went 0-12, but then went back on a tear. In the remaining 13 games of the month for Stockton, Jameson Hannah hit .358/.433/.509 with seven extra-base hits. June would be the best month of the year for the center fielder, hitting .303/.389/.444 with 13 walks and 10 extra-base hits.

The hot hitting kept on going through the first week of July for Jameson Hannah. He hit .360, going 9-25, but then he didn’t play for nine days. When he returned for the second half of the month, things didn’t go well. The then 21-year-old went 14-60 (.223). It led to a down month where he hit .271, a good average, but only walked three times and didn’t show much power – leading to a .629 OPS over his 20 games.

At the very end of July the Oakland Athletics traded Jameson Hannah to the Cincinnati Reds in exchange for Tanner Roark. The Reds sent Hannah to join their Advanced-A affiliate in Daytona. His first week with the Tortugas went well – going 8-27 (.296) with four extra-base hits. But he went into a slump in the final two weeks of the season, hitting just .175 the rest of the way.

For all 2019 Season Reviews and Scouting Reports – click here (these will come out during the week throughout the offseason).

Jameson Hannah Spray Chart

Jameson Hannah Scouting Report

Position: OF | B/T: L/L

Height: 5′ 9″ | Weight: 185 lb | Drafted: 2nd Round, 2018

Born: August 10, 1997

Hitting | He shows an average hit tool.

Power | His current power is well below-average, but there’s some raw power in there to tap into that could put him in that 12-15 HR range in the future.

Speed | He has above-average speed, but he hasn’t exactly used it well on the bases in his career.

Defense | He’s a solid defender in center field and can handle left field, too.

Arm | His arm is below-average and is what would likely keep him from spending much time in right field at the highest level.

There are some things to like with Jameson Hannah. He’s athletic – there’s good speed there, and while he’s short – he’s just 5′ 9″ – he’s not small. He’s got some strength on his frame. The raw tools at the plate are there. Toss in that he can play center field and you’ve got a good base to start with.

But there are some questions there, too. While there is some raw power in there, it’s going to take a big change to get to it. In 2019 he hit ground balls at an extremely high rate – 56% – and without a change it’s likely he’ll struggle to tap into that raw power and turn it into game power. His speed, while grading out well, isn’t used well on the bases. He was 8-for-16 in stolen bases in 2019. With his speed you would expect both a better ratio as well as more attempts.

If he can max out his tools, he’s got the profile for a starting center fielder. But there’s a lot of room between where he’s at now and that ceiling. There’s more of a 4th/5th outfielder type of likelihood in the profile than that of an every day player. The margin for a starting center fielder here is thin – he’s going to need to max out the hit and power, or get pretty close to it, to make it work.

Longest Home Run of the Year

He only hit two home runs on the year, and neither came with the Reds organization. That leaves me with no information here.

Interesting Stat on Jameson Hannah

During the 2019 season he only had 36 plate appearances against pitchers that were younger than he was. In those 36 plate appearances he struck out just three times.

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12 Responses

  1. Norwood Nate

    I’m just not impressed with his profile as a prospect. The Cal-league is the most hitter friendly in the minors and he didn’t excel in that environment. In my experience following prospects, when you have to squint pretty hard to imagine a scenario where everything works out (maxes out his potential) it doesn’t typically work out. I know there was some discussion on the rankings list, but I still prefer Sugilio’s potential and Crooks’ production/proximity to Hannah’s.

    • Tom

      I agree, although the scouting side indicates he could tap into that talent eventually and be a player who from 25 on has an impact.

    • Wes

      Yeah I’m pretty shocked that was the guy the reds wanted in return for Roark. Bet the A’s were thrilled to sell him off, which Doug didn’t mention.

      Reds need to run their show more like A’s. Granted it’s been a while since they won a playoff game but atleast they win games and fill their stadium and make moves that make mlb team better even if it’s at expense of minor leaguers. They make wise free agent acquisitions and I believe without a doubt they drafted Murray with expectation he would never come there just to save they money it would cost to sign him as they deemed that the best fit for those budget dollars. Just as they were thrilled to acquire mlb talent in Roark while selling off Hannah who they’ll never miss.

      • Doug Gray

        Why would I mention the A’s were “thrilled” to sell him off when there is literally zero evidence of that being the case?

      • Tom

        When the A’s go down in the standings, it’s not for long. Really pretty amazing.

      • wes

        You didn’t mention the cash involved in the trade Doug. Not sure the exact amount, but it was a whole lot of money considering his glaring weakness and fact reds gave up a quality starter in Roark.

      • MK

        Yeah but it was Roark for a two month rental. Wasn’t like they were getting Grienke. Maybe 8 or 9 starts for a pretty good prospect

  2. Tom

    https://www.mlb.com/reds/news/reds-first-year-orientation-camp

    This orientation camp is a sign that the organization is getting a grip over the what it means to get everyone rowing in the same direction as a member of the Cincinnati Reds. It also shows they are invested in their players careers in every way they can think of. I expect they will find benefits from this and find ways to expand and improve it. You think of a guy like Josh Hamilton who needed Narron’s brother to basically be his personal guide in order to tap into his talent. To a much smaller degree, each and every player could benefit from the right advice at the right time from a reliable and available source. The Reds are finding ways to provide and foster that.

    • Jefferson Green

      Thanks for posting, Tom. That is a great article – and program – that I hadn’t seen. It seems that DW keeps adding these types of things into the system, and it has to help players maximize their training and talent.

  3. Colorado Red

    Another nice, all be it, not great prospects.
    Needs a lot of work, but could make it.
    Seems to be a bit streaky, but who isn’t.
    Tanner, was sold back end of the rotation guy, not going to get a top 100 for him.

  4. KyWilson1

    Is that 12-15 hr pop with todays baseballs, or 12-15 hr with the balls that dont leap into orbit?